© Street Combatives 2016
Q:  Do you teach MMA 'Mixed Martial Arts’ ?   A:  No.

Mixed Martial arts is a fantastic sport and I can not say enough good stuff about it. They are by far

some of the best conditioned athletes in the world. However, the techniques they use as well as the

mindset they teach focuses on ‘SPORT FIGHTING’  and the focus is on giving the audience a good

show.

When they fight, MMA fighters focus only on one fighter.  Their ears are focusing on what their

corner guys are telling them.  They are not worried about multiple attackers or weapons being used

against them.  They are not concerned about getting injured or killed because there is a medic right

there next to the cage and there are rules in place to reduce and eliminate severe injuries.  They

know that there is a referee right there watching the fight making sure that each fighter plays by the

same rules and that no one gets hurt.  They know that they can quit anytime they want by simply

tapping out.

  There are no rules on the streets

  There are weapons used on the streets

  There are multiple attackers on the streets 

On the streets there is always more than one attacker and weapons are used in over half of all

fights.  There are no judges making sure the fight stays fair and if you get knocked out there is a real

good chance that your attackers will keep attacking you until they are satisfied that they beat the

sh,t out of you.  If you get seriously injured or killed,  IT IS NOT a concern of theirs.  These are the

realities of the street.

_________________________

Here at Street Combatives, we stress from day #1 that there are no fair fights and you must do what

it takes to win, even if that means gouging eyes, ripping groins and bitting.  Much of our training

involves multiple attackers so students ingrain the fact that you must keep moving and to never

focus on just one attacker.

MMA fighters love to go to the ground and stay there as they attempt to submit their opponent. 

However, do that on the streets and bad guy #2 is going to join the fight.  That is why we have a

four second rule.  If you are taken to the ground in a fight, you have FOUR seconds to get to your

feet before attacker #2 joins the fight.  It only takes one time for students to realize that it is better

to face two attackers on their feet than on their back.

MMA fighters train on nice soft and forgiving mats so dropping to the ground on their knees and

elbows isn’t a concern of theirs.  Sorry but the streets are hard and made from CONCRETE and

PAVEMENT.  Dropping to your knees and elbows is only going to get you busted up before the fight

even starts.   Some guys have told us that they wouldn’t do that on the streets but statistics tells us

that we will fight how we train.

Also. on the streets there are broken bottles, rocks, needles, urine, rusty nails and all kinds of other

items that you really don’t want to be rolling around on top of. 

We train students that often hits are a distraction which allows us to get in and break something.

We don't train too much in the traditional arts of hitting and kicking.  Our hits are mostly to the

throat and to the eyes and our kicks are mostly to the ankles, knees and to the groin.  We also train

in body manipulation, head cranking, eye gouging, throat crushing and we are not afraid to bite the

attacker if it helps stop the attack so we can go home.  

We teach that it is better to break an attackers eye/bone/joint and go after attacker #2 than to

attempt to submit attacker #1.  On the streets if you try to submit attacker #1, attacker #2, 3 and 4

comes over and start kicking, punching and stabbing you in the back.

Because the use of weapons (knifes, sticks, hammers, screw drivers, etc. ) is so common in street

fights today, about half of our training involves learning how to avoid and not get killed by an

attacker with a weapon.   Weapon defense is not taught in any MMA gym that I know of.

Street fights can happen anytime and anywhere.  That is why we train in the dark, with strobe light

flashing, loud music blaring, in extreme close quarters and with simulated injuries like with busted

legs and cut hands.

Much like MMA, we focus a lot on endurance and strength.  We don't train ourselves for three to

five, 5 minute rounds, but we do train for 2 to 3 one minute fights and we do this through 4 to 5 two

minute high intensity workouts at the end of each training session.

Here are the rules of MMA:   There is NO

• Butting with the head.

• Eye gouging of any kind.

• Small joint manipulation.

• Striking to the spine or the back of the head. (see Rabbit punch)

• Striking downward using the point of the elbow. (see Elbow (strike))

• Throat strikes of any kind, including, without limitation, grabbing the trachea.

• Clawing, pinching or twisting the flesh.

• Grabbing the clavicle.

• Kicking the head of a grounded opponent.

• Kneeing the head of a grounded opponent.

• Stomping a grounded opponent.

• Kicking to the kidney with the heel.

• Spiking an opponent to the canvas on his head or

neck. (see pile driver)

• Throwing an opponent out of the ring or fenced

area.

• Holding the shorts or gloves of an opponent.

• Spitting at an opponent.

• Engaging in unsportsmanlike conduct that causes

an injury to an opponent.

• Holding the ropes or the fence.

• Using abusive language in the ring or fenced area.

• Attacking an opponent on or during the break.

• Attacking an opponent who is under the care of the referee.

• Attacking an opponent after the bell (horn) has sounded the end of a round.

• Flagrantly disregarding the instructions of the referee.

• Timidity, including, without limitation, avoiding contact with an opponent, intentionally or

consistently dropping the mouthpiece or faking an injury.

• Interference by the corner.

• Throwing in the towel during competition.

What are our rules? 

WE DON’T HAVE ANY RULES! 

  WE DO WHAT EVER IT TAKES TO WIN AND GO HOME.
Street Combatives
Specializing in Close Quarter and Knife Combatives
© Street Combatives   2015
Q:  Do you teach MMA 'Mixed Martial Arts’ ?   A:  No.

Mixed Martial arts is a fantastic sport and I can not

say enough good stuff about it. They are by far

some of the best conditioned athletes in the world.

However, the techniques they use as well as the

mindset they teach focuses on ‘SPORT FIGHTING’ 

and the focus is on giving the audience a good

show.

When they fight, MMA fighters focus only on one

fighter.  Their ears are focusing on what their

corner guys are telling them.  They are not worried

about multiple attackers or weapons being used

against them.  They are not concerned about

getting injured or killed because there is a medic

right there next to the cage and there are rules in

place to reduce and eliminate severe injuries.  They

know that there is a referee right there watching the

fight making sure that each fighter plays by the

same rules and that no one gets hurt.  They know

that they can quit anytime they want by simply

tapping out.

  There are no rules on the streets

  There are weapons used on the streets

  There are multiple attackers on the streets 

On the streets there is always more than one

attacker and weapons are used in over half of all

fights.  There are no judges making sure the fight

stays fair and if you get knocked out there is a real

good chance that your attackers will keep attacking

you until they are satisfied that they beat the sh,t

out of you.  If you get seriously injured or killed,  IT

IS NOT a concern of theirs.  These are the realities

of the street.

_________________________

Here at Street Combatives, we stress from day #1

that there are no fair fights and you must do what it

takes to win, even if that means gouging eyes,

ripping groins and bitting.  Much of our training

involves multiple attackers so students ingrain the

fact that you must keep moving and to never focus

on just one attacker.

MMA fighters love to go to the ground and stay

there as they attempt to submit their opponent. 

However, do that on the streets and bad guy #2 is

going to join the fight.  That is why we have a four

second rule.  If you are taken to the ground in a

fight, you have FOUR seconds to get to your feet

before attacker #2 joins the fight.  It only takes one

time for students to realize that it is better to face

two attackers on their feet than on their back.

MMA fighters train on nice soft and forgiving mats

so dropping to the ground on their knees and

elbows isn’t a concern of theirs.  Sorry but the

streets are hard and made from CONCRETE and

PAVEMENT.  Dropping to your knees and elbows is

only going to get you busted up before the fight

even starts.   Some guys have told us that they

wouldn’t do that on the streets but statistics tells us

that we will fight how we train.

Also. on the streets there are broken bottles, rocks,

needles, urine, rusty nails and all kinds of other

items that you really don’t want to be rolling

around on top of. 

We train students that often hits are a distraction

which allows us to get in and break something. We

don't train too much in the traditional arts of

hitting and kicking.  Our hits are mostly to the

throat and to the eyes and our kicks are mostly to

the ankles, knees and to the groin.  We also train in

body manipulation, head cranking, eye gouging,

throat crushing and we are not afraid to bite the

attacker if it helps stop the attack so we can go

home.  

We teach that it is better to break an attackers

eye/bone/joint and go after attacker #2 than to

attempt to submit attacker #1.  On the streets if you

try to submit attacker #1, attacker #2, 3 and 4

comes over and start kicking, punching and

stabbing you in the back.

Because the use of weapons (knifes, sticks,

hammers, screw drivers, etc. ) is so common in

street fights today, about half of our training

involves learning how to avoid and not get killed by

an attacker with a weapon.   Weapon defense is not

taught in any MMA gym that I know of.

Street fights can happen anytime and anywhere. 

That is why we train in the dark, with strobe light

flashing, loud music blaring, in extreme close

quarters and with simulated injuries like with

busted legs and cut hands.

Much like MMA, we focus a lot on endurance and

strength.  We don't train ourselves for three to five,

5 minute rounds, but we do train for 2 to 3 one

minute fights and we do this through 4 to 5 two

minute high intensity workouts at the end of each

training session.

Here are the rules of MMA:   There is

NO

• Butting with the head.

• Eye gouging of any kind.

• Small joint manipulation.

• Striking to the spine or the back of the head. (see

Rabbit punch)

• Striking downward using the point of the elbow.

(see Elbow (strike))

• Throat strikes of any kind, including, without

limitation, grabbing the trachea.

• Clawing, pinching or twisting the flesh.

• Grabbing the clavicle.

• Kicking the head of a grounded opponent.

• Kneeing the head of a grounded opponent.

• Stomping a grounded opponent.

• Kicking to the kidney with the heel.

• Spiking an opponent to the canvas on his head or

neck. (see pile driver)

• Throwing an opponent out of the ring or fenced

area.

• Holding the shorts or gloves of an opponent.

• Spitting at an opponent.

• Engaging in unsportsmanlike conduct that causes

an injury to an opponent.

• Holding the ropes or the fence.

• Using abusive language in the ring or fenced area.

• Attacking an opponent on or during the break.

• Attacking an opponent who is under the care of

the referee.

• Attacking an opponent after the bell (horn) has

sounded the end of a round.

• Flagrantly disregarding the instructions of the

referee.

• Timidity, including, without limitation, avoiding

contact with an opponent, intentionally or

consistently dropping the mouthpiece or faking an

injury.

• Interference by the corner.

• Throwing in the towel during competition.

What are our rules? 

WE DON’T HAVE ANY RULES! 

  WE DO WHAT EVER IT TAKES TO WIN AND GO HOME.
   Street Combatives      Specializing in Close Quarter and Knife Combatives